Edit document structure with the Content and Tags panels (Acrobat Pro)

Predefined PDF Tags. The following tags are predefined in tagged PDF. Article Annotation Bibliography Entry Block Quote Caption Code The following standard Adobe element tag types appear in the New Tag submenu in the Tags tab Options menu, as well as in the Tag Type pop-up menu in the TouchUp.

Logical order makes it possible to identify the relationships between blocks of content, each of which contains text in correct reading order. When selected, all new comments and form fields are added to the tag tree after the selected tag element. For Alternate Text, type text that describes the figure. Do one or more of the following:. A two-dimensional arrangement of data or text cells that contains table row elements as child elements and may have a caption element as its first or last child element.

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Predefined PDF Tags. The following tags are predefined in tagged PDF. Article Annotation Bibliography Entry Block Quote Caption Code The following standard Adobe element tag types appear in the New Tag submenu in the Tags tab Options menu, as well as in the Tag Type pop-up menu in the TouchUp.

I made the jump from XP to Windows 7. Windows 7 has done away with "keywords" and gone to "tags". I like this system better but what I find horribly frustrating is that there are many file types to which I cannot add "tags". This thread is locked. You can follow the question or vote as helpful, but you cannot reply to this thread. I have the same question In reply to mattvanhill's post on February 7, The operating system itself does not provide tag functionality.

Although it would be cool if the OS did it natively. Isn't that what the old WinFS file system was supposed to do, but it never saw the light of day?

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The order in both temporal and spatial senses of these contents, and why that order should matter to you, isn't obvious, but it is nonetheless important to understand. What is content order? There are four basic ways in which the contents of any given PDF page may be ordered for the purpose of expression to a user. The first two are familiar to most users: In both cases, the concept of "content order" is meaningful only in terms of the so-called "z-order" - which item is "in front" of or "behind" which other items appearing at that same location on the page.

For example, to correctly display a shaded box containing text, the correct z-order places the text "in front of" the shading. If the text appears "behind" the shading, it would disappear on screen and in print — likely not the desired effect.

Getting the z-order right, however, says nothing about the linear ordering of the characters, words, lines and paragraphs of the text — that is an entirely different issue. Up until version 5 of Adobe Acrobat, z-order was the only type of content order that could be applied to PDF-based content. Text and graphics appeared on the screen in an order that best supported accurate display and printing, and that was enough. In Acrobat 5, Adobe Systems began to respond to the other two key considerations for content expression.

The third type of content order - reading order - denotes the linear ordering of the letters and words of the text. Without the concept of reading order, a PDF file has literally no idea which letter or word precedes another letter or word on the page.

All it knows is which z-order to use for the objects appearing at a given coordinate on the page. Click image to enlarge. With reading order, the characters on the page are understood to have a linear sequence of appearance quite apart from z-order. When the reading order is correct, it becomes possible to accommodate disabled users who require a simple stream of text, or to use with PDAs and other mobile devices that reflow content to display a wide-formatted page on a small, narrow screen.

The fourth type of content order, logical, is an extension of the reading order concept. Logical order makes it possible to identify the relationships between blocks of content, each of which contains text in correct reading order. Logical order allows you to introduce concepts such as tables, lists and headings, as well as provide alternate text for images, descriptive text for links and form fields, and so on. A PDF file that includes logical order has been "tagged;" however, the fact that tags exist in a given PDF is itself no indication that the logical order is valid, or even close to valid.

Properly tagging a PDF file is not the simplest of matters, as we'll see. Characteristics of a fully accessible PDF include: Valid reading order has been established for all page content Tags have been created and validated for all logical content Images are given correct alternate descriptions Tables are correctly tagged to represent the table structure Form-fields, links and other interactive and multimedia features are managed to ensure their maximum usability All characters include valid To Unicode assignments.

Taken together, the concepts of reading order and logical order are described as "structure. Imagine using your computer with the screen turned off, and you'll get some idea of how important logical order is to anyone who needs screen-reader software to read your PDF. To most users, PDF files seem to work fine just the way they are. They look right and print well, and that is good enough. For many uses and users, however, it is not enough — and it may even be against the law.

A PDF file that's not structured correctly is not accessible to users with disabilities, and it won't display properly on a PDA. Section , enacted in June , is an amendment to the Rehabilitation Act that requires all US Federal agencies to ensure that their web-based content is accessible to those who must use assistive technology to access electronic documents.

State governments are following with their own accessibility requirements. Section also requires that Federal contractors submit accessible documentation as part of their contract specifications, and many states are also beginning to implement this mandate.

Apart from government-mandated accessibility for electronic content, many businesses and organizations are finding sound business reasons for producing accessible documentation, forms, brochures and other content.